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Word Worth Volume III, 2003, Issues are available by clicking on the name of the month below.Get Acrobat Reader  Adobe Reader is needed to access them.  A free copy is available here:

Editorials

Arts

Columns

You Do What You Have to Do       Marien Helz

January

A Good Place to Work                    Susan Johnson

   ...Pat mentioned that her son’s friends were shocked that the Unabomber, Theodore Kaczynski’s, family were the ones who had turned him in.
   “My mother would turn me in,” her son had told them.
   “Darned right I would,” she had responded.

AWH1036.jpg (33996 bytes)
Armin W. Helz

   There are almost as many business models as there are CEOs available to head them.  Centralized, decentralized, and matrix are just a few types that fade in and out of popularity, inhabiting the corporate-speak of their respective eras.  The best business model, the “good place to work” (GPTW) model is rarely mentioned and difficult to find.

The Saddest Words                        M H Perry

February

Same River, Separate Kayaks       Susan Johnson

   In a poem about a child’s game, about the woods and New England, about his weltanschauung, Robert Frost wrote:
  I’d like to get away from earth awhile
  ...then come back to it again and begin over.
  May no fate willfully misunderstand me
  ...half grant what I wish and snatch me away
  Not to return. Earth’s the right place for love:


Renee Oubre

   In a recent study designed to predict which marriages would succeed and which would fail, researchers say they found that if both partners in a couple liked the same television shows and the same foods, that seventy-five percent of the time they could be counted on to stay together.
...Is that what we’ve come to—the McDonaldization of Western matrimony?

The Assassination of...                      Marien Helz

March

Edible Art                          Susan Johnson

    I hardly ever watch trash TV and since more and more of it is becoming trash, I rarely watch any television. In addition, I have never been a fan of Michael Jackson—I might be able to guess correctly the name of one of his songs if forced to do so, but that’s all, and the primary reason I know that song is because of a parody of it when it was popular. Nonetheless, I got snagged ...

Cake Art

by Carolyn Scott Panzica

      Art can be as permanent as a bronze sculpture or as ephemeral as a dancer in mid-arabesque...  Does it matter to Baryshnikov that his art lasts only as long as he is on stage? No. He is as driven to express himself with plies as Rodin was driven to express himself in paint and metal ...  So it is for Carolyn Scott Panzica who has come to express herself through sugar and glycerin, creating esoteric works...

Academic Integrity                   Marien Helz

April

Luxury of Slowness               Susan Johnson

     A small college in Western New York recently made national news because the college president and basketball couch brought an academically unqualified player into the college in order to improve the team. The College happened to be a church related college, and upon the discovery of the deception and dishonesty, there were appalled statements ... Franciscan values, however, are absolutely irrelevant.

Photography

By Renee Oubre

     I was born with the need for speed. Loved going straight down the hill on my skis, as fast as possible, and there wasn't a car built with a speedometer high enough for me. I did the dishes against a stopwatch and took my showers that way too. But lately, speed has lost its allure.
     ... kayaking down the Colorado River...I bobbed gently in the sun, a pair of Mallards swam up to me and, for the first time ever, I noticed ...

The Changing Face of Pacifism      Marien Helz

May

Meditations on Tagore               K Srinivasan

   In the 1600’s George Fox formed a religion the primary tenet of which has been pacifism. In the intervening centuries, both the nature of war and the nature of pacifism have changed....

   Just as those claiming to be pacifists have changed, so has war within the last century.

Rediscovering
Rabindranath
Tagore

Rabindranath Tagore
b. May 7, 1861, d. August 7, 1941
Nobel Prize for Literature 1913

    Is it such a coincidence that our modern Mother’s Day and Mothering Sunday fall in the month of May? This was the month dedicated by the ancient Romans to Maia, goddess of spring growth, and adopted by the Catholic Church of Rome for honoring Mary, the mother of Jesus.

Agape                               Marien Helz

June

Re-Wrighting a Disaster          Susan Johnson

   When a student of poet Theodore Roethke’s died after being thrown from a horse, he wrote an elegy for her. The poems ends:

    Over this damp grave I speak the words of my love:
    I with no rights in this matter,
    Neither father nor lover.

   These lines suggest a connection that we often don’t recognize existing between people.
Frank Lloyd Wright

Architecture
   Along the western bluffs of Lake Erie, just south of Buffalo, New York are a number of properties that were once fine summer estates built by wealthy families around the turn of the last century. Precious few remain occupied by heirs of their original owners; most are gone or relegated to secondary uses.
   Some of the homes are now shabby, their once beautiful stone walls crumbling...

Changing of the Guard               M H Perry

July

Billsburg                                              Charles Miess

     Two and a half months ago, Susan Johnson informed us that she would be leaving, or taking a "hiatus," from Word Worth. She is in the corporate offices of an international air and space company.... One can easily understand why her company would seek ever increasing amounts of her time and why she would continue to rise in position. Johnson has a remarkable ability to focus with microscopic attention to detail without ever losing sight of the larger picture. Ron Colgrove
    1968—South Dakota is really beautiful, but boy is it desolate—it’s mostly rolling prairie as far as you can see. We crossed the Missouri River this morning, so we’re about halfway across the state and more than halfway across the whole United States by now. Our bicycles are holding up well; but can you believe that I’ve worn out two rear tires already. Dad, you can quit worrying about the traffic—we have the road to ourselves, with only one car going by every few hours.
The Etiquettely Challenged         Marien Helz August A Journey Into Darkness
Charles Miess
   The telephone was invented in the 1870’s, and extended to nearly every American home and business by the 1950’s with enhancements such as caller id and voice mail as prevalent today as the phone itself was in the 50’s. In spite of its prevalence, however, the appropriate use of the phone and its extensions eludes many people. Telephone etiquette involves such basic common sense that it is dumbfounding as to why .... Renee Oubre
   I had once heard that the darkness in a coal mine is as close to the grave as you can get. I turned off my cap light to test that assertion. A blanket of absolute blackness enveloped me with a dead silence to go with it. I thought about the report of an accident in another mine where a machine had cut into a large underground reservoir of water. Only one person was rescued, and that was after he spent five days ....
Either Pass or Pull Over           Marien Helz September The Other McCarthy Era—I
Aurelia Perry
     At one time or another, we’ve all been stuck driving behind someone in the passing lane on a thruway who tooled along, oblivious to the line of cars forming behind while they neither passed nor pulled back into the right hand lane. It seems that in driving, as in life in general, a good rule to get people to follow is either pass or pull over. When stuck behind someone dawdling along, we’d like them to either get it done or give it up. A Rose for Allyson

By Charles Miess
     There is a moment frozen in time (via candid photograph) from the 1939 Academy Awards banquet in which the young singer and actress Deanna Durbin sits across the table from ventriloquist Edgar Bergen. Durbin, 18, was to receive a special Oscar that night for her work as a child star in movies, and Bergen had been chosen to present it to her. In the photograph they’re at dinner, talking: soup has just been served though neither of them has touched it yet...
Autumn Ritual                                  Charles Miess October The Other McCarthy Era—II
Aurelia Perry
  But my experience of autumn is more than just passion and beauty. I always feel a dash of melancholy in my heart this time of year. Partly so, because autumn reminds me of my own mortality, and partly because the precious days of summer are rapidly becoming no more than a misty memory. Oh, I’m sure I’ll be here to enjoy them again next year, yet it won’t be quite the same. Mixed with this bit of melancholy is a subtle apprehension—a hint of foreboding for the cold weather that is sure to come. Ron Colgrove
   In addition to the enticement of Bergen’s abilities, there was the hopelessly impertinent character of Charlie McCarthy: an uninhibited adolescent who dressed in the manner of a high-society roller and talked like a pugilistic sailor. He was...quick with words, flirtatious, iconoclastic, carefree, clear-eyed, and supremely self-confident—with a voracious appetite for feminine company, the possibilities of wealth, and ice cream sodas. Charlie did not suffer fools—period—and he found them everywhere.
The Maladaptation of Adaptation    M H Perry November The Other McCarthy Era—III
Aurelia Perry
   It’s easy to make murders, car chases, and battles seem exciting. They don’t happen that often in real life, and what is quite different seems exciting at first. The abnormal, the abrasive, the offensive grab our attention. The problem is that those things are like a cotton candy of the intellect. They stick on our thoughts just as cotton candy sticks on our hands, and they decay our rationality and creativity just as cotton candy rots our teeth. ...a scene between Mae West and Charlie McCarthy in which  McCarthy had left his house keys on West’s bedroom dresser when he’d gone up to see her etchings (what was Bergen thinking?) put the show over the top. ... the studio was deluged by ...angry correspondence,... NBC...banned West and mention of her name, ...."The network apologized, Chase and Sanborn apologized, and I went and hid for a week," Bergen recalled. "Our ratings went up..."
Rediscovering Melville                 M H Perry December God Wasn't Listening...            Charles Miess
  A century and a half ago, Herman Melville penned a short story that has frustrated college students and stymied critics from that time on. Bartleby, the Scrivener is an elusive work because the behavior and motivation of the characters are not only unusual but inexplicable.
   The story takes place in a law office at a time when there were not only no computers, but essentially no typewriters as well.

Bartleby the Scrivener

Herman Melville

   It’s not that I don’t like cats. Why, to me there’s no greater pleasure than to sit in a comfortable chair in front of a cozy fireplace with a glass of Chablis, a John Steinbeck novel, and a cat purring contentedly on my lap. I like cats—really—but when I’m eating, I prefer not to have them around.
   It’s not that I’m squeamish either. I can do the dirtiest job in the world and go straight to a good meal.

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Publisher: Aurora Artisans®, LLC       Editor: M. H. Perry
Contributors: Marien Helz
· Aurelia Perry · Susan Johnson · Banwell Goddard · David Clark · Tiffany M. [Stuck] Perry · Wayne Johnson · Alastair Reid · Pei-Hua Chiang  · Ilina Sen [Rita Banerji] · Ruth Hitchings · Darin Boville · Ron Colgrove · Carl Dennis · Renee Oubre · Carolyn Scott Panzica · K Srinivasan · Charles Miess · Aurelia Perry · Cam Adams · Michelle M Mayer · Gary Earl Ross · Cheryl Rofer · Charles Bartolotta · Joy Walsh · Kevin H. Siepel · John T. Baker · Tambourine Gray · Harvey Kaye · Nettie Veling · Graceann Macleod · Anna Seymour · Kateri van Huystee · Kevin Roe · Beverly Roe · Dave Trageser · Susanne Woyciechowicz · Nancy Palmer Miess · Jean Katter · Leslie Marks · Britta Monaco · Nick Monaco · Malka Davis · Howard Miller · Christian Belz · Christopher Wittman · Linda Cross · Bruce Berger ·  Barbara DuBois · James Francis Cahillane · Cathy Crenshaw Doheny · Ross M. Hall · Bonnie Fields · Philip K. Edwards · Helen Peppe · Elizabeth Morana · Jennifer Campbell · Helen Peppe · Elaine Greensmith Jordan · Marie O'Donnell · Robert Coats · Sean Flury · Joshua DeMont · Lisa Wiley · Shaun Bellavia · Dr. Sheenu Srinivasan · Charlie Callan · Judith Washington · Sunny Woods · Hannah French· Joel Hooks · Brian Michael Norris ·  Eryn Leedale-Merwart  ·  Michael J. Cahill ·  Samantha Greiner  · Amy Conley · Vira Katolik · David Kiphuth · Shelby List · Susan Coburn

Distinguished Selections:  Hale Chatfield ·  Armin W. Helz ·  Rabindranath Tagore ·  Herman Melville ·  William Shakespeare ·  E. A. Robinson ·  Mark L Kaufman ·  Edward Fitzgerald ·  William  Wordsworth ·  William Blake ·  John Greenleaf Whittier ·  Alexander Pope ·
© 2018 Word Worth®—World magazine of Ideas & the Arts